Department of Mathematics

West Chester University

Mathematics Information
Office: Room 101
25 University Avenue
West Chester, PA 19383
Phone (610) 436-2440
Fax (610) 738-0578
Email: Department Chair


Spring 2015 Colloquium/Seminar Schedule

Colloquium talks will normally be on a Wednesday (usually in UNA 158 from 3:15-4:15).

These seminars/colloquium talks may be by visiting speakers, WCU faculty, or WCU students, and are open to all interested students and faculty.

Send an e-mail to jmclaughl@wcupa.edu, if you would like to be on the e-mail list to receive advance notice of upcoming talks.

Previous Semesters: Fall 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2010, Spring 2010, Fall 2009, Spring 2009, Fall 2008, Spring 2008, Fall 2007, Spring 2007, Fall 2006, Summer 2006, Spring 2006.

Department of Mathematics
West Chester University
Spring 2015 Mathematics Colloquium presents

presents

 

sommer gentry

United States Naval Academy

 

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Optimization, Ethics, and Organs: Mathematical Methods for Rationing Transplantation

 

Wednesday, February 11, 2015 from 3:15 to 4:15PM

UNA 162

The notion of rationing healthcare is taboo: people naturally feel no one should limit the resources spent extending human life, particularly theirs or their loved ones’. Transplantation can transform the lives of organ recipients, but must be rationed by access to the far-too-small supply of donated organs, so it is a microcosm of ethical dilemmas in rationing healthcare.  Operations research techniques can maximize the number of life years gained from transplantation, or redistrict geographic allocation units to distribute organs more fairly across large countries like the United States.  Paired kidney exchange, in which a living kidney donor who is incompatible with his intended recipient exchanges organs with another incompatible pair, uses graph algorithms for maximum weight matching to select the best combination of exchanges.  Beyond the sophistication of methods, the real challenge is to help decision-makers scrutinize how "fair" and "optimal" can be defined.  I will share my experiences as a mathematician in the transplant community.

Sommer Gentry is Associate Professor of Mathematics at the United States Naval Academy, and is also on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is a senior investigator with the Scientific Registry for Transplant Recipients in the U.S. She has a B.S. in Mathematical and Computational Science and an M.S. in Operations Research, both from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT. She was a Department of Energy Computational Science Graduate Fellow, and won an award for excellence in communicating computational science to a lay audience. She designed matching optimization methods used for nationwide kidney paired donation registries in both the United States and Canada, and is now creating optimized sharing boundaries to help the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network reduce geographic disparity in liver allocation. Her work has attracted the attention of major media outlets including Time Magazine, Reader’s Digest, Science, the Discovery Channel, and National Public Radio. Gentry has received the MAA’s Henry L. Alder award for distinguished teaching by a beginning mathematics faculty member.

For further information e-mail mfisher@wcupa.edu or sgupta@wcupa.edu

 

Department of Mathematics
West Chester University
Spring 2015 Mathematics Colloquium presents

presents

 

DAVID JOYNER

United States Naval Academy

The Man Who Found God’s Number

Wednesday, March 4, 2015 from 3:15 to 4:15PM

UNA 162

This is a tale of two problems. For years, Tom Rokicki worked to determine the exact value of God's number for the Rubik's Cube (the smallest number of moves needed to solve the cube in the worst case), a very difficult problem. By the time he solved this, Tom was completely deaf. Digitizing human hearing, and then implementing that into a medical device, is also a very difficult problem. Thanks to recent medical advances, Tom's hearing was restored about the same time that he discovered God's number.

David Joyner received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Maryland, College Park. He held visiting positions at the University of California San Diego, Princeton, and the Institute for Advanced Study before joining the United States Naval Academy in 1987, where he is now a professor. He received the USNA’s Faculty Researcher of the Year award in 2007. His hobbies include writing, chess, photography, and the history of cryptography

For further information e-mail mfisher@wcupa.edu or sgupta@wcupa.edu

 

 

 

 

Note: Talks will be added to the schedule throughout the semester. Check back for updates.