Department of Mathematics

West Chester University

Mathematics Information
Office: Room 101
25 University Avenue
West Chester, PA 19383
Phone (610) 436-2440
Fax (610) 738-0578
Email: Department Chair


Fall 2012 Colloquium/Seminar Schedule

Each Thursday there will be a mathematics seminar (usually in UNA 120 from 3:15-4:15), while colloquium talks will normally be on a Wednesday (usually in UNA 158 from 3:15-4:15).

These seminars/colloquium talks may be by visiting speakers, WCU faculty, or WCU students, and are open to all interested students and faculty.

Send an e-mail to jmclaughl@wcupa.edu, if you would like to be on the e-mail list to receive advance notice of upcoming talks.

Previous Semesters:Spring 2012, Fall 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2010, Spring 2010, Fall 2009, Spring 2009, Fall 2008, Spring 2008, Fall 2007, Spring 2007, Fall 2006, Summer 2006, Spring 2006,

Thursday, August 30th, 2012
11:00AM to 12:00PM Conference Room, 25 University Avenue
Professor Mike Fisher (West Chester University Mathematics Department)

Combinatorial Games Theory Seminar - I

 

Thursday, September 6th, 2012
11:00AM to 12:00PM Conference Room, 25 University Avenue
Professor Mike Fisher (West Chester University Mathematics Department)

Combinatorial Games Theory Seminar - II

 

Thursday, September 13th, 2012
11:00AM to 12:00PM Conference Room, 25 University Avenue
Professor Mike Fisher (West Chester University Mathematics Department)

Combinatorial Games Theory Seminar - III

 

 

 

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012
3:15 to 4:15PM UNA 158
Fall 2012 Mathematics Colloquium
Alex Rice (Bucknell University)

“Arithmetic Patterns in Dense Sets of Integers"”

Arithmetic Combinatorics is a rapidly developing area with close connections to number theory, combinatorics, harmonic analysis and ergodic theory. Roughly speaking, the field is concerned with finding and counting arithmetic structures in sets, often contained in the integers, and it includes such seminal results as Szemeredi's Theorem on arithmetic progressions and the Green-Tao Theorem on arithmetic progressions in the primes. Here we give a brief introduction and survey of some foundational results in this area, and later we focus on improvements and generalizations of two theorems of Sarkozy, the qualitative versions of which state that any set of natural numbers of positive upper density necessarily contains two distinct elements which differ by a perfect square, as well as two elements that differ by one less than a prime number. Included will be joint work with Neil Lyall and Mariah Hamel.

Alex Rice is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, PA. He received his Ph. D. in mathematics from the University of Georgia, and his current research interests are in arithmetic combinatorics.

For further information e-mail mfisher@wcupa.edu or sgupta@wcupa.edu.

 

Thursday, September 27th, 2012
11:00AM to 12:00PM Conference Room, 25 University Avenue
Professor Mike Fisher (West Chester University Mathematics Department)

Combinatorial Games Theory Seminar - IV

Thursday, September 27th, 2012
3:15 to 4:15PM UNA 119
Fall 2012 Mathematics Seminar
Jimmy Mc Laughlin (West Chester University)

"PARTITION BIJECTIONS, A SURVEY - II"

Over the coming weeks we will work through (as much as possible) Pak’s wonderful survey on integer partition bijections. The aim will be to get a better feel for the method of bijective proofs of partition identities and the interplay between combinatorial identities and analytic basic hypergeometric identities.

Thursday, October 4th, 2012
11:00AM to 12:00PM Conference Room, 25 University Avenue
Professor Mike Fisher (West Chester University Mathematics Department)

Combinatorial Games Theory Seminar - V

 

Thursday, October 4th, 2012
3:15 to 4:15PM UNA 119
Fall 2012 Mathematics Seminar
Jimmy Mc Laughlin (West Chester University)

"PARTITION BIJECTIONS, A SURVEY - III"

Thursday, October 11th, 2012
11:00AM to 12:00PM Conference Room, 25 University Avenue
Professor Mike Fisher (West Chester University Mathematics Department)

Combinatorial Games Theory Seminar - VI

 

Thursday, October 11th, 2012
3:15 to 4:15PM UNA 119
Fall 2012 Mathematics Seminar
Jimmy Mc Laughlin (West Chester University)

"PARTITION BIJECTIONS, A SURVEY - IV"

 

 

Thursday, October 18th, 2012
11:00AM to 12:00PM Conference Room, 25 University Avenue
Professor Mike Fisher (West Chester University Mathematics Department)

Combinatorial Games Theory Seminar - VII

 

Thursday, October 25th, 2012
11:00AM to 12:00PM Conference Room, 25 University Avenue
Professor Mike Fisher (West Chester University Mathematics Department)

Combinatorial Games Theory Seminar - VIII

 

Thursday, October 25th, 2012
3:15 to 4:15PM UNA 119
Fall 2012 Mathematics Seminar
Jimmy Mc Laughlin (West Chester University)

"PARTITION BIJECTIONS, A SURVEY - V"

 

 

 

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012
3:20 to 4:15PM UNA 158
Professor Viorel Nitica(West Chester University Mathematics Department)

A Coloring Invariant for Ribbon L-Tetrominos

Abstract: In this talk we investigate several tiling problems for regions in a square lattice by ribbon L- shaped tetrominoes. One of our results shows that tiling of the first quadrant by ribbon L-tetrominoes is possible only if it reduces to a tiling of the first quadrant by 2x4 and 4x2 rectangles. A consequence of the result is the classification of all rectangles that can be tiled by ribbon L-shaped tetrominoes.


 

Thursday, November 1st, 2012
11:00AM to 12:00PM Conference Room, 25 University Avenue
Professor Mike Fisher (West Chester University Mathematics Department)

Combinatorial Games Theory Seminar - IX

 

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012
3:20 to 4:15PM UNA 158
Fall 2012 Mathematics Colloquium
Garth Isaak (Lehigh University)

“Perfect Maps”

Arranging 00011101 on a circle, the consecutive triples are exactly the 8 distinct binary triples. Can we do something similar with a larger alphabet and longer strings? These are called DeBruijn cycles and have a long and interesting history. More recently higher dimensional versions called perfect maps have been investigated. Try, for example creating a 9 by 9 array with entries 0,1,2 such that when wrapped on a torus each of the 81 distinct 2 by 2 patterns with 3 symbols appears exactly once. Mathematical and algorithmic questions and applications related to both of these will be presented.

Garth Isaak received an undergraduate degree with majors in Chemistry, Mathematical Sciences and Physics from Bethel College in Kansas, a Ph.D. from RUTCOR, the Operations Research Center at Rutgers University. Following two postdoctoral years at Dartmouth he moved to Lehigh University where he now Professor of Mathematics and Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences.

For further information e-mail mfisher@wcupa.edu or sgupta@wcupa.edu

 

Wednesday, November 27th, 2012
3:20 to 4:15PM UNA 158
Fall 2012 Mathematics Colloquium
Professor Rosemary Sullivan (West Chester University)

"A Modification of Sylvester's Four Point Problem"

In 1865, Sylvester posed the problem of finding the probability that four points randomly chosen with a uniform distribution over a compact convex region K in the plane form the vertices of a convex quadrilateral. This led to substantial research on the ratio
            rho_K = E(area(T))/area(K) ,
where T denotes a triangle formed by three independent and uniformly distributed points in K. In this talk we consider the problem of studying the behavior of the ratio
            rho_P* = E(area(T))/E(L^2) ,
where L is the distance between two independent points with distribution P and T is a triangle with three independent vertices with distribution P. We call this the Modified Sylvester Four Point Problem.

All are welcome to join us for tea in the Students Lounge after the talk.

 

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012
3:00 to 3:50 PM UNA 158
Fall 2012 PiMuEpsilon Talk
Professor Whitney George(West Chester University)

"An Introduction to Knot Theory"

One of the underlying goals in knot theory is to determine when two knots are equivalent. A knot is simply an embedded circle in space. Therefore, we can try to answer this question with hands-on examples. However, this simple task can become difficult and the need for mathematics becomes relevant. In this talk, we will discuss some basic knot invariants, such as crossing number, and the three Reidemeister move, and then extending them to links.

All are welcome to join us for tea in the Students Lounge after the talk.

 

 

Note: Talks will be added to the schedule throughout the semester. Check back for updates.