Graduate Catalog

2012 – 2013

Office of Graduate Studies and Extended Education
McKelvie Hall, 102 W. Rosedale Avenue
West Chester University
West Chester, PA 19383
Phone: 610-436-2943
Fax: 610-436-2763
gradstudy@wcupa.edu


Revised August 2012

Kinesiology


206 Sturzebecker Health Sciences Center
West Chester University
West Chester, PA 19383
610-436-2260
Dr. Fry, Chairperson and Graduate Coordinator, M.S. in General Physical Education
Dr. Atkinson, Graduate Coordinator, M.P.A. with a Graduate Certificate in Sport Management and Athletics
Dr. Stearne, Graduate Coordinator, M.S. in Exercise and Sport Physiology

Professors [top]

Eve Atkinson, Ed.D., Temple University
Frances Cleland, P.E.D., Indiana University
Frank F. Fry, Jr., D.P.E., Springfield College
John Helion, Ed.D., Columbia University
Monica P. Lepore, Ed.D., New York University
Sheri A. Melton, Ph.D., Louisiana State University
Karin Volkwein, Ph.D., University of Tennessee

Associate Professors

Kathleen Ellis, Ph.D., Michigan State University
Margaret Ottley, Ph.D., Temple University
Paul K. Smith, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University
David Stearne, Ph.D., Temple University
W. Craig Stevens, Ph.D., Temple University

Assistant Professors

Terence Beattie, M.A., Canisius College
Matthew Cummiskey, Ph.D., Temple University
Melissa Reed, Ph.D., East Carolina University
Melissa Whidden, Ph.D., University of Florida

Instructors

Edward Kubachka, M.S., West Chester University
Mary M. Williams, M.A., University of London

Programs of Study [top]

The Department of Kinesiology offers two programs leading to a master of science degree, one in general physical education and the other in exercise and sport physiology. The M.S. in general physical education offers academic course work for teaching physical education in schools or for obtaining employment in various professions related to physical education. The M.S. in exercise and sport physiology, which also offers a concentration in atletic training, enriches academic preparation for working in adult fitness, cardiac rehabilitation, and corporate wellness. Both master of science degrees offer thesis tracks that are designed primarily to meet the individual needs of graduate students who want to pursue graduate work beyond the master’s degree or a career in research.

In addition, the department offers a master of public administration degree with a graduate certificate in sport management and athletics. This professional degree focuses on the comprehensive career preparation of practicing athletic and sport managers. Designed for individuals aspiring to leadership and management roles in the complex world of interscholastic, intercollegiate, recreational, and professional sports, as well as corporate fitness programs, the curriculum is built on acquiring the experiential understanding of administrative and managerial practices in athletic settings. It will prepare candidates with the knowledge and skill necessary to apply theory, research, and experience to solve academic, athletic, and sport/event management challenges. Culminating internships are an integral part of the program where students are mentored in sport management experiences within their concentration area, including interscholastic (middle and high school), intercollegiate (NCAA Division I, II, or III), professional (major or minor leagues), club or recreational activities (YMCA and other youth sport organizations), and corporate fitness.

Comprehensive Examination

The comprehensive examination for graduate students is administered twice a year, in early March and late October. Each examination consists of an elective course portion, given for two hours on a Tuesday, and the required course portion, given for two hours on the following Thursday.

Students who want to take the examination must be currently enrolled, admitted to degree candidacy and should have completed all required course work. In addition, students should have completed the majority of their elective requirements. A letter of intent to take the comprehensive examination should be filed with the coordinator of graduate studies. Letters of intent should be filed by February 15 for the March examination or September 15 for the October examination, respectively.

Upon receipt of the letter of intent and with the approval of the coordinator, students will be sent a letter explaining the details, time, and place of the examination.

Note: The comprehensive exam is not required for the M.S. in exercise and sport physiology concentration in athletic training.

Master of Science in General Physical Education [top]

Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a graduate degree program at West Chester University, applicants must present either a baccalaureate degree earned in their anticipated major area of health or health and physical education, or equivalent preparation in a related field, and the following:

  1. Undergraduate prerequisites:
    1. Human anatomy
    2. Human physiology
    3. Kinesiology
    4. Exercise physiology
  2. Requirements of a 2.8 G.P.A. or higher on a 4.0 scale in either the thesis track or research report track
  3. Approval of application by the department graduate committee

Acceptance recommendations are made by the department graduate committee.

Certificate in Adapted Physical Education (15 semester hours)

The certificate in adapted physical education is designed to meet the adapted physical education National Standards for Competency in Teaching Adapted Physical Education in the public schools.
KIN 579, 582, 583, 584, 586, 587

Admission to M.S. Degree Candidacy

During the 12 to 15 hours of precandidacy, students must complete any three of the departmental core courses with a minimum GPA for these and all other courses of 3.0.

Students must apply for candidacy within one semester after completing 12-15 hours of precandidacy.

Requirements for the M.S. Degree

  1. Satisfactory completion of the M.S. curriculum with a minimum GPA of 3.0
  2. Satisfactory performance on written and/or oral comprehensive examination
  3. Successful completion of the thesis or research project
  4. Oral defense of the thesis (for thesis track only)

Curriculum (33-34 semester hours)

  1. Degree core (21 semester hours)
    EXS 600; KIN 572, 580, 585, 601, 602, and 681
  2. Additional degree requirements - thesis track (12 semester hours)
    KIN 608 and 610
    Electives selected under advisement (6)
  3. Additional degree requirements - research report track (13 semester hours)
    KIN 606 and 607
    Electives selected under advisement (9)

The thesis proposal must be formally approved during thesis seminar (KIN 608) before the student may register for thesis (KIN 610).

Master of Science in Exercise and Sport Physiology

Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a graduate program at West Chester University, applicants must present a bachelor's degree in physical education or related field and the following:

  1. Undergraduate preqrequisites:
    1. Human anatomy
    2. Human physiology
    3. Kinesiology
    4. Exercise physiology
    5. Fitness assessment/exercise prescription or electrocardiography and stress testing
  2. Requirements for one of the following tracks:
  3. Thesis track
    1. GPA: 2.8 or higher on a 4.0 scale
    2. GRE: 1000 (combined verbal and math) or higher recommended
    or
  4. Research report track
    1. GPA: 2.8 or higher on a 4.0 scale
    2. GRE: 900 (combined verbal and math) or higher recommended
    3. Approval of application by the department graduate committee

Acceptance recommendations are made by the department graduate committee.

Requirements for Admission to Degree Candidacy

During the 12 to 15 hours of precandidacy, students must complete any three of the departmental core courses with a minimum GPA for these and all other courses of 3.0.

Students must apply for candidacy within one semester after completing 12-15 hours of precandidacy course work.

Requirements for the M.S. Degree

  1. Satisfactory completion of the M.S. curriculum with a GPA of 3.0
  2. Satisfactory performance on written and/or oral comprehensive examination (not required for the athletic training concentration)
  3. Successful completion of the thesis or research project (EXS 698 Research I/EXS 699 Research II)
  4. Oral defense of the thesis (for thesis track only)

Curriculum (33-40 semester hours)

  1. Degree core (18 semester hours)
    EXS 572, 585, 600, 698, 699; statistics (STA 511 recommended)
  2. Concentration core (9 semester hours)
    EXS 681, 687, and 688
  3. Electives (6 semester hours)
    An additional six credit hours are required for the thesis track (KIN 608/610).
  4. Internship (6 semester hours)
    KIN 611 and 612
    Internship experience may be required of students in the research report track who did not have comparable experience as an undergraduate and/or have no work experience in their chosen field of study.

Concentration in Athletic Training

Curriculum (40 semester hours)

  1. Degree core (18 semester hours)
    EXS 600; KIN 572, 585, 601, 608, and HEA 526 or STA 511
  2. Concentration core (13 semester hours)
    SMD 500, 501, 592, 595, and 693
  3. Electives (9 semester hours)
    Select three courses from the following: HEA 503, 510, 515, or 550; KIN 603, 681, 687, 688, 691

Master of Public Administration with a Graduate Certificate
in Sport Management and Athletics

Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the graduate requirements for admission to a graduate program at West Chester University, applicants must submit scores from the Miller Analogies Test, Graduate Record Examination, or Graduate Management Admissions Test; an essay with a clear focus on career plans; and two letters of reference from professional supervisors that address the applicant's administrative potential. All application materials are to be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies and Extended Education and labeled: "Attention, M.P.A. Application of (student's name)." Following receipt of these materials, the M.P.A. director will schedule an admissions interview with the applicant.

Admission to M.P.A. Degree Candidacy

During the 15 semester hours of precandidacy, majors in the graduate certifcate program must complete three of the administrative core courses, and two of the sport and athletic administration core courses with a minimum GPA for these courses of 3.0.

Requirements for the M.P.A. Degree

  1. Satisfactory completion of the M.S.A. curriculum shown below with a minimum overall GPA of 3.0.
  2. Satisfactory performance on the written and/or oral comprehensive examination.

Curriculum (34-39 semester hours)

  1. Administrative core (18 semester hours)
    PPA 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, and 507
  2. Certificate requirements (24 semester hours)
  1. Sport management and athletic core (12 semester hours)
    EXS 600; KIN 513, 514, and PPA 513
  2. Electives (6 semester hours)
    KIN 553, 580, 601, 602, 680, 681, 685, and other electives under advisement
  3. Internship (6 semester hours)
    KIN 611, 612 (must complete both)

Consult adviser to determine appropriate time, arrangements, and placement for internships

Note: Students who do not want to enroll in a degree program can apply for the certificate-only program in sport management and athletics, which includes the 24 semester hours listed above. Contact the sport management and athletics coordinator for more information.

Course Descriptions [top]

Kinesiology
Symbol: KIN unless otherwise indicated

513 Theories and Principles of Sport Management (3) This course is designed to provide an overview of the management responsibility of the sport administrator, including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling the sport enterprise. Emphasis will be placed on personnel, financial concerns, facility management, and public relations.

514 Problems and Issues in Sport Management (3) This course is designed to provide an overview of contemporary problems and issues in sport management, including an analysis of sport trends with a review of sport-governing agencies and organizations and their affect on athletic department programs.

550 Elementary Physical Education Workshop (3) Orientation for the teaching of elementary physical education. Principles and practices; appropriate activities for various grade levels.

553 Facility, Event, and Risk Management in Sport (3) This course provides an overview of planning and management of sport facilities and events. Students will study the elements of planning and designing sport facilities while investigating the inherent risk management issues associated while operating sport venues. Additionally, students will learn how to plan, execute, and manage various sporting events while addressing safety and risk-management issues.

EXS 572 Advanced Motor Learning (3) An investigation of the theories, research, and practical applications of the processes and conditions involved in the teaching and learning of physical skills.

579 Inclusive Practices in Adapted Physical Education (3) This course explores inclusive practices in physical education, observes programs and classes in the field, discusses and debates best practices regarding inclusion in PE, identifies barriers to successful inclusive practices, and identifies philosophical issues in general physical education that impact adapted physical education and students with disabilities. This course will not solve all problems with inclusion. PREREQ: Some knowledge of adapted physical education.

580 Sociological and Psychological Aspects of Sport and Physical Education (3) Social, psychological, and cultural factors influencing sport and physical education. Discussion of pertinent issues and research applications.

581 Adapted Physical Education (3) Techniques for a program of adapted physical education in the public school. Application of activities to benefit the child with a temporary or permanent disability.

582 Assessment and Development of Individualized Programs in Adapted Physical Activity (3) This course prepares health and physical education teachers to address the needs of children and teens with disabilities through quality assessment; development of physical education; curriculum; establishment of individual, group, and program goals and objectives; adaptation to physical activities; and effective evaluation. Inclusive practices and establishment of recommended criteria for adapted physical education will be included. PREREQ: Some knowledge of adapted physical education.

583 Medical and Pathological Issues Related to Adapted Physical Activity (3) This course is designed to familiarize graduate students in physical education or special education with health and medical issues of low-incidence disabilities and the impact these issues have on participation in adapted physical activity programs.

584 Disability Sport and Adapted Aquatics (3) This course provides information about disability sports, athletics, and competitive adapted activities to physical education professionals. In addition, students will understand the concepts of vertical integration; segregated vs. inclusion sport participation; rules, regulations, and procedures for a variety of adapted and disability sports; and the psychosocial impact of sports on people with disabilities. Also, this course will cover adapted aquatics and provide national credentialing in teacher of adapted aquatics through American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (AAHPERD) if prerequisites are met or, if not, the teaching assistant of adapted aquatics credential.

EXS 585 Biomechanics (3) A review of, or introduction to, the basic principles of biomechanics and the application of those principles to research and teaching.

586 Professional Issues in Adapted Physical Activity (3) This course is designed to develop skills needed to be a professional adapted physical educator. Current issues being professionally debated in the field will be discussed, synthesized, and explored, including professional philosophy, technology use, consultation strategies and services in adapted PE, professional and ethical behaviors, confidentiality, collaboration and crossdisciplinary models of service, adapted physical education national standards, and exams. PREREQ: KIN 579, 582, 584.

587 Contemporary Issues in Adapted Physical Activity: Students in the Autistic Spectrum (3) Introduction to the issues of adapting physical activities for individuals within the autistic spectrum, including school-based physical education and community-based recreation programs.

SMD 592 Seminar in Sports Medicine (3) This class requires students to review and research papers on specific and timely topics in sports medicine which they will read prior to class, present, and then have critically reviewed by the instructor and other students. The suggested topics will be subject to change if instructors view additional issues as more current and relevant to athletic training and sports medicine.

EXS 600 Research Methods in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (3) Techniques of research applied to the field of health, physical education, and recreation.

601 Statistical Design for Research and Evaluation in Physical Education (3) The practical and theoretical application of the basic concepts of elementary statistics as they relate to evaluative procedures, research, and teaching in physical education.

602 Advanced Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education (3) Major philosophical theories of sport. Discussion of various conceptual, movement/aesthetic, and social-political issues.

603 Professional Literature Seminar (3) Provides students with the skills necessary to review and critically analyze the professional literature and current findings in physical education; useful for the student planning to conduct research.

605 Curriculum Trends in Physical Education (3) Analysis and design of contemporary curriculum models of instruction in K-12 physical education.

606 Research Project Seminar I (2) A course for master's candidates who select the report option. Students select a problem for the research report, review literature, develop procedures, and collect data. They are expected to complete the first three chapters of their research reports during Seminar I. PREREQ: EXS 600.

607 Research Project Seminar II (2) Master's candidates register for this course after completing Seminar I. In this course, students complete chapters four and five of the research report. PREREQ: KIN 606.

608 Thesis Seminar (3) A course for the student who selects the thesis option. The candidate selects a topic, reviews the literature, develops procedures, and prepares a proposal acceptable to the thesis committee. They then register for KIN 610. PREREQ: EXS 600.

609 Independent Study and Special Projects (1-3) Students select independent study projects and develop proposals. These projects may be in support of students' research or related to their vocations. The proposals must be accepted and approved by the coordinator of graduate studies in the semester prior to registration for independent study.

610 Thesis (3) Students must register for the thesis after completion of KIN 608. One additional enrollment in KIN 610 may be allowed with the approval of the graduate coordinator. PREREQ: KIN 608.

611-612 Intern Study (3) (3) For the M.S.A. student in athletic administration who needs or desires practical experience in administering athletic programs. (The student may elect 3-6 credits of internship experience.)

615 Special Topics (1-3) In depth study of selected topics current to the interests and needs of professionals serving in the field of kinesiology.

EXS 680 Scientific Principles of Coaching (3) Recent trends in theories and techniques of teaching sports. Mechanical principles of efficient movement. Research related to competitive performance. Specialists serve as guest panelists.

EXS 681 Advanced Exercise Physiology (3) Clinical and laboratory use of exercise in evaluating, maintaining, and modifying human physiological processes: growth development, metabolism, and weight control; cardiovascular and respiratory functions in health and disease; and neuromuscular integration and performance. Stress physiology, and training and conditioning.

685 Gender Equity in Sport (3) The physiological, psychological, and sociological effects of exercise and sport on women.

EXS 687 Applied Muscular Physiology (3) This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the structure and function of skeletal muscle and its responses and adaptations to exercise.

EXS 688 Applied Cardiovascular Physiology (3) This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms underlying cardiovascular function and the effects of acute and chronic exercise on these mechanisms.

EXS 690 Exercise and Older Adults (3) A course designed to prepare professionals to assess fitness levels of people over age 50 and scientifically design exercise and fitness programs to meet the specific needs of older participants.

EXS 691 Advanced Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription (3) An in-depth study of how exercise is used in clinical settings for diagnostic, rehabilitative, and preventive purposes. ACSM guidelines will be emphasized. Designed to prepare the student for the ACSM certification exam (exercise specialist).

EXS 692 Clinical Practicum in Exercise Science (3) This course provides experience in a clinical setting under the supervision of qualified medical staff. Experiences will include prescription and supervision of exercise for patients in settings such as hospitals and outpatient clinics. PREREQ: Approval of graduate coordinator.

693 Topics in Sports Medicine (3) A second-year graduate course covering environmental topics, theory, and practice of evidence-based sports medicine, as well as educational and course assessment concerns for sports medicine professionals.

EXS 698 Research I (3) This course, along with the subsequent EXS 699, is the culminating experience in the program curriculum. It includes development of hypothesis and methods under the direction of a faculty adviser. If taken as a thesis, this course should culminate in the acceptance of the thesis proposal by an appropriate committee of faculty. If taken as either a report or thesis, the course results in the writing of the first three chapters (introduction, review of literature, and methods) and IRB approval.

EXS 699 Research II (3) This course includes data collection, statistical analysis, and writing the last three chapters of the report/thesis. Reports are submitted to the faculty research adviser for a grade. Thesis must be defended and approved by the committee. After approval, the thesis must be typed in accordance with specifications contained in the “Guide to the Preparation of the Master’s Thesis,” a copy of which may be obtained from department offices or online. After the dean of graduate studies and extended education has approved the thesis, the student is responsible for transmitting all required copies to the library for binding. PREREQ: EXS 698.

Service Courses

The following courses are open to students in all curricula, with no prerequisite in health or physical education required: KIN 550, 580, 581, 605, 650, 680, and 685.

Sports Medicine
Symbol: SMD

500 Human Cadaver Anatomy (2) A regional study of the gross structure of the human body and human cadaver dissection covering the back, upper and lower limbs, head, neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Emphasis is on the structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, and peripheral nervous systems. COREQ: SMD 501.

501 Human Cadaver Anatomy Laboratory (2) A human cadaver dissection course accompanying SMD 500. The gross structures of the back, upper and lower limbs, head and neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis are studied. COREQ: SMD 500.

595 Orthopedic Surgical Techniques (3) A course designed to enhance the sports medicine professional’s knowledge and awareness of common orthopedic surgical techniques. Tissue response to surgical inervation and postsurgical rehabilitation considerations will be addressed.

693 Selected Topics in Sports Medicine (3) A second-year graduate course covering environmental topics, theory, and practice of evidence-based sports medicine, as well as educational and course assessment concerns for sports medicine professionals.