Undergraduate Catalog

2014 – 2015


2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog Archive

Office of Admissions
Emil H. Messikomer Hall
100 W. Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA 19383
Phone: 610-436-3411
Fax: 610-436-2907
ugadmiss@wcupa.edu


Revised September 2014

Academic Programs

Degree Requirements

Applicable Catalog Year Language and Culture Requirements Interdisciplinary Courses
Basic Proficiency General Education Components Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree
Diverse Communities Courses General Education Requirements Responsibility
Dual Degrees and Majors General Education Requirements - Policy Writing Emphasis Courses

GENERAL INFORMATION

Responsibility

The ultimate responsibility for satisfying all graduation requirements is the student’s. Students are encouraged to check their Degree Progress Reports (DPRs) on myWCU regularly, so they maintain a thorough understanding of all outstanding requirements. Faculty academic advisers are expected to provide accurate, helpful information to students, and students are expected to be knowledgeable about the academic policies and procedures governing the completion of their degrees. The student and faculty adviser are expected to consult with each other regularly. Under West Chester University’s advising program, all students have faculty advisers, appointed through their major departments, who counsel them on academic matters throughout their undergraduate years. Students who have not yet declared a major are advised by the Pre-Major Academic Advising Center. Students need to meet with their advisers before registration periods to discuss course enrollment and be given access to online registration.

West Chester University faculty, staff, and students must activate and maintain regular access to University-provided electronic mail accounts AND are responsible for accessing electronic mail to obtain official University communications. Failure to access the electronic mail account will not exempt individuals from associated responsibilities and liabilities.

Students are expected to complete all degree requirements within the semester in which they intend to graduate. Any unmet degree requirements can only be completed for that semester’s graduation date, if the attempt to complete the degree requirement was initiated prior to the end of the semester, and the requirement was completed within 30 days of the actual graduation date.

Applicable Catalog Year

The West Chester University Undergraduate Catalog is produced annually in print and online versions. Regardless of the method of distribution, the catalog in effect for a student's year of admission dictates the general education requirements that the student must follow. Students are bound by the major, minor, and cognate requirements in the catalog for the academic year for which they are accepted into the major or minor. In some instances, accrediting, certification, and/or Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) standards necessitate the change in major, minor, and cognate requirements. In such situations, the respective college will formally inform each student that he or she must meet the new requirements. Readmitted students are bound by the requirements in place for general education at the time of readmission. Major, minor, and cognate area requirements are also bound at the time of readmission, except where permission is granted by the respective department.

Students are expected to complete all degree requirements within the semester in which they intend to graduate. Any unmet degree requirements can only be completed for that semester's graduation date, if the attempt to complete the degree requirement was initiated prior to the end of the semester, and the requirement was completed within 30 days of the actual graduation date.

Dual Degrees and Majors

Students are permitted to pursue dual majors under the same degree or dual degrees with the concurrence of the participating departments. (See "Dual Degrees" and "Double Majors" in the "Academic Policies and Procedures" section of this catalog.)

Basic Proficiency

Students who do not demonstrate basic proficiency in English or mathematics may be required to take developmental courses (Q00-level) as prerequisites of their degree programs. These courses do not count towards graduation.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE

  1. Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 120 semester hours, distributed as shown in the curriculum for the student's major field. NOTE: Some programs will require more than 120 credits for degree completion. These programs are described within the department’s pages in this catalog.
  2. Achievement of a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.000 (C) and an average of at least 2.000 (C) in the major field. Some programs require a higher GPA.
  3. Attendance at West Chester University for at least 30 semester hours of the degree program, normally the final 30 semester hours of the degree program.
  4. Fulfillment of any special requirements or program competencies that are particular to a department or a school.
  5. Fulfillment of all financial obligations to the University, including payment of the graduation fee, and of all other obligations, including the return of University property.
  6. Compliance with all academic requests, including filing an application for graduation in the Office of the Registrar.
Students are expected to complete all degree requirements within the semester in which they intend to graduate. Any unmet degree requirements can only be completed for that semester's graduation date, if the attempt to complete the degree requirement was initiated prior to the end of the semester, and the requirement was completed within 30 days of the actual graduation date.

BACCALAUREATE GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

The General Education Goals Common to All Baccalaureate Curricula

A broad education emphasizes the enhancement of oral and written communication skills and mathematics, and encompasses experiences in the humanities; the social, behavioral, and natural sciences; and the arts. At the same time, this education must be versatile because of the many new courses and areas of study that are constantly becoming available. At West Chester University, the general education program is designed to provide students with the knowledge, perspectives, and competencies expected of them as citizens of the state and of the world. The University believes that a liberal education base will prepare students to think and communicate as professionals, to understand social and global contexts of their lives, to transfer knowledge and skills from one setting to another, to recognize ethical implications of professional practice, and to balance the various dimensions of their personal and professional lives. Therefore, West Chester University strives to give students the abilities to

  1. communicate effectively,
  2. employ quantitative concepts and mathematical methods,
  3. think critically and analytically,
  4. demonstrate the ability to think across and about disciplinary boundaries,
  5. respond thoughtfully to diversity, and
  6. make informed decisions and ethical choices.

Policy on General Education Requirements

Students, both those matriculating as freshman and transfer students, who have not completed the academic foundations requirements in mathematics and English by the time they have earned 60 credits toward graduation must have the permission of the dean of their school or college (or his or her designee) to schedule additional courses.

A total of 48 semester hours of general education requirements must be completed for a baccalaureate degree. Those 48 credits are allocated among English composition, mathematics, diverse communities, communication, science, behavioral and social sciences, humanities, the arts, interdisciplinary studies, and student electives. Credit requirements for each area are provided in the following list. NOTE: Except for the nine student elective semester hours under Category IV, courses taken to satisfy general education requirements may not be taken pass/fail. This includes courses taken to satisfy interdisciplinary, diverse community, and writing emphasis general education requirements. Readmitted students are bound by the requirements in place for general education at the time of readmission.

Specific general education courses may be required by a major or minor program, but no course may have its numeric credits duplicated in any application. A student may use the course from one major to meet the requirements of the second major. In this case, the adviser will work with the student to determine which course(s) should be used to address any remaining credits. But in no case may a student graduate with fewer than 120 credits at the 100 level or above. Students should be aware that, although general education requirements have been met, major degree requirements may necessitate a specific minimum performance level in general education courses, e.g., a grade of C- or better.

The following is an example of a general education course that also fulfills program requirements: BIO 110 is a biology requirement and serves as a general education option.

Consult your major degree program for guidance.

Students in the Honors College should consult pages 109-110 concerning general education requirements.

General Education Components (48 semester hours)

I. Academic Foundations (18 semester hours)

  1. English Composition (6 semester hours)
    WRT 120, and one of the following: WRT 200, or 204, or 205, or 206, or 208, or 220
    Policy for placement in English composition courses:
    Placement in the appropriate composition course is determined by the score on the SAT Writing Exam, combined ACT English/Writing scores, or AP test scores. If a student scores 620 or higher on his/her SAT, he/she does not have to take WRT 120. Students who are placed in English Q20 may choose to take the Basic Writing Challenge Exam (administered by the Department of English during the spring prior to the arrival of freshmen) to determine whether or not they are appropriately placed. A student who places into and passes WRT 200 or above is not required to take WRT 120. The student, however, must still complete a minimum of 120 credits to graduate. The SAT scores used for placement are reviewed each year and adjusted at times to make sure writing placements are functioning to maximize student success at the University. A student enrolled in ENG Q20 must pass with a grade of C- or better before he/she enrolls in WRT 120. IMPORTANT: Credits earned in ENG Q20 are computed in the student’s GPA. However, these credits will not be counted as part of the 120 college-level credits required for graduation. All students who do not place out of WRT 120 must take and pass WRT 120 as well as WRT 200 (or WRT 204, 205, 206, 208, or 220) to graduate, and no substitution of other courses satisfies this requirement. A student who fails this course after three attempts will be dismissed immediately following the third failure regardless of GPA.
  2. Mathematics (3 semester hours)
    College-level mathematics course designated by the student's major department.
    Policy for placement in mathematics: Placement in the appropriate mathematics course is determined by the student's math SAT score or performance on the Mathematics Placement Examination administered by the Department of Mathematics. All entering freshmen other than those specified below, with a math SAT score at 430 or below, are placed in MAT Q01. Students with a math SAT at 440, 450, 460, or 470, or who passed MAT Q01 with a grade of at least C- are placed in MAT Q00. Students with a math SAT 480 or higher may enroll in any of the general education mathematics courses. The following pertains to students planning on taking MAT 161 Calculus I. If their math SAT is 480 - 580 inclusive, they are placed in MAT 110, pre-calculus. If their math SAT is 590 or higher, they are placed in MAT 161. The following pertains to students in early grades preparation and middle grades preparation. If their math SAT is 470 or less, they are placed in MAT Q01 and must pass the course with a grade of C- before enrolling in MAT 101, Mathematics for Teachers of Children I. If their math SAT is 480 or higher, they are placed in MAT 101.
    IMPORTANT: Credits earned in MAT Q00 or Q01 are computed in the student's GPA. However, these credits will not be counted as part of the 120 college-level credits required for graduation.
  3. Public Speaking (3 semester hours)
    One communication course* will be required of all WCU students.
    Choose from the following:
    SPK 208 or 230
    *WCU will continue to accept transfer equivalencies for SPK 101 and 216 as the public speaking general education requirement, provided the student successfully completed the course at an accredited institution prior to fall 2006.
  4. Diverse Communities (3 semester hours)
    Effective for all students entering fall 2002 and after, one diverse communities course will be required of all WCU students. Embracing the goal of graduating students who are committed to creating a just and equitable society, Diverse Community courses (or "J" courses) focus on historically marginalized groups and are framed by theories that lend understanding to the analysis of structural inequities. They seek to foster an informed and reasoned openness to an understanding of difference. The requirement for a diverse communities course may be fulfilled by any approved course with a "J" designation in the course schedule.Approved diverse community courses are indicated by a boxed "J" symbol in the catalog course description. A diverse communities course may simultaneously fulfill another degree requirement or distributive requirement in general education if it has the same prefix as those in the science, behavioral and social sciences, humanities, or arts categories within the distributed requirements. (For example, PSC 301 could count as a course within the behavioral and social sciences category.) If a "J" course is used to fulfill one of the distributive area requirements, general education student electives increase from nine to 12 credits as needed to reach 48 general education credits and 120 credits for graduation. At no time can any course substitute within the academic foundations area. A single course may fulfill the “I” and “J” requirements.
    NOTE: A diverse communities course may only transfer to WCU if the course from a student's prior institution has been submitted to and approved by the Diverse Communities Committee of the Curriculum and Academic Policies Council (CAPC). Students must file a petition to transfer this type of course with the Office of the Special Assistant for Academic Policy.
  5. Interdisciplinary Requirement (3 semester hours)
    One interdisciplinary course will be required of all WCU students. This course, regardless of the academic department that offers it, places the emphasis on the relationship among three or more disciplines, requiring the student to think critically. The student will synthesize and/or integrate the disciplines in the investigation of a concept, culture, or idea resulting in a student who demonstrates the attributes of general education Goal 4 (demonstrate the ability to think across and about disciplinary boundaries). Interdisciplinary courses may be fulfilled by any approved course with an "I" designation in the course schedule. Approved interdisciplinary courses are indicated by the boxed "I" symbol in the catalog course descriptions. Because interdisciplinary courses are, by design, treatment of a subject from different disciplines, interdisciplinary courses may not be used to fulfill a general education requirement in the distributive areas (science, behavioral and social sciences, humanities, the arts). However, a course may simultaneously satisfy the interdisciplinary and diverse communities requirements.

II. Distributive Requirements (21 semester hours)

Note: Courses taken to satisfy the distributive area of general education requirements and courses taken to satisfy the diverse communities, interdisciplinary, or writing emphasis requirements may not be taken pass/fail.

Also, interdisciplinary courses are, by design, treatment of a subject from different disciplines; interdisciplinary courses may not be used to fulfill a general education requirement in the distributive areas (science, behavioral and social sciences, humanities, and the arts).

Note: WCU will continue to accept transfer credits for courses other than those identified as “approved” general education courses, if the course equivalent has the same prefix as those in the science, behavioral and social sciences, humanities, or arts categories within the distributive requirements, including those assigned the 199 course number.

  1. Science (6 semester hours)
    Select courses from at least two of the following areas. Courses must be selected from outside the student's major department. Approved courses are listed below:
    1. Biology—BIO 100 or BIO 110
    2. Chemistry—CHE 100, CHE 103, CHE 107, or CHE 160
    3. Computer Science—CSC 110, CSC 115, or CSC 141
    4. Earth Science—ESS 101, ESS 111, ESS 112, ESS 130, or ESS 170
    5. Physics—PHY 100, PHY 105, PHY 123, PHY 130, PHY 140, PHY 170, or PHY 180
  2. Behavioral and Social Sciences (6 semester hours)
    Select courses from at least two of the following areas. Courses must be from outside the student's major department. Approved courses are listed below:
    1. Anthropology—ANT 102 or ANT 103
    2. Psychology—PSY 100
    3. Sociology—SOC 200 or SOC 240
    4. Economics—ECO 101, ECO 111, ECO 112, or ECO 200
    5. Geography—GEO 101 or GEO 103
    6. Government—PSC 100, PSC 101, or PSC 213
  3. Humanities (6 semester hours)
    Select courses from at least two of the following areas. Courses must be selected from outside the student's major department. Approved courses are listed below:
    1. Literature—LIT 100, LIT 165, LIT 219, LIT 220, CLS 165, CLS 260, or CLS 261
    2. History—HIS 100, HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 150, HIS 151, HIS 152, or HIS 444
    3. Philosophy—PHI 100, PHI 101, PHI 150, PHI 180, PHI 206, PHI 207, PHI 282
  4. The Arts (3 semester hours)

    One course is to be selected from several areas. Approved courses are listed below:
        Art—ARH 101, ARH 104, ART 106, ART 111, ART 228, or ART 231
        Dance—DAN 132, DAN 133, DAN 134, DAN 135, DAN 136, DAN 137, or DAN 150
        Film—FLM 200
        Music—MHL 121, MHL 125, MHL 210, or MTC 110
        Theatre—THA 101 or THA 103

III. Student Electives (9 semester hours)
Students are encouraged to choose electives in consultation with their major adviser.

All students are encouraged to complete the above program in their first two years at West Chester.

Additional Baccalaureate Requirements

IV. Writing Emphasis Courses (9 semester hours)
The rationale for writing emphasis courses is that writing is integral to all academic learning in liberal and professional studies. These courses are not foundational; they are intended to enhance. The University regards writing as much more than a set of basic language skills. Syllabi for writing emphasis courses shall clearly state that improving the student's writing abilities is an objective of the course and specifically indicate the percentage of the final course grade that is derived from writing assignments. Writing emphasis courses will provide the student with both formal and informal writing opportunities, direct classroom instruction in the techniques of composition, and at least one opportunity to review written work with feedback from the instructor. The University curricula provide for

  1. writing emphasis courses each semesterin traditional liberal studies (for example, English literature, history, anthropology, sociology, chemistry, and physics) and in professional studies (for example, criminal justice, early childhood education, nursing, and public health); and
  2. a general requirement that all students must take three of these writing emphasis courses, in addition to English composition.

All students who take their entire general education program at West Chester University must complete at least three approved writing emphasis courses that total at least nine credits. All transfer students who enter with fewer than 40 credits must complete at least three approved writing emphasis courses for a total of at least nine credits at West Chester University. Transfer students who enter with 40-70 credits must take at least two writing emphasis courses that total at least six credits. Students who transfer more than 70 credits must take at least one writing emphasis course that totals at least three credits. All students entering the University fall 2002 and later (native or transfer) must take three credits of writing emphasis at the 300-400 level. WRT 120, 200, 204, 205, 206, 208, or 220 do not count as writing emphasis courses. Each writing emphasis course may simultaneously fulfill another degree requirement.
Note: Writing emphasis courses may not be transferred to WCU.

Approved Diverse Communities Courses

tr> tr> HON 312 Education Systems and Social Influence tr> HON 312 Education Systems and Social Influence tr> HON 312 Education Systems and Social Influence tr> HON 312 Education Systems and Social Influence tr> HON 312 Education Systems and Social Influence tr> HON 312 Education Systems and Social Influence tr> HON 312 Education Systems and Social Influence
ANT 321 American Indian Today
ANT 347 The Culture of Cities
CLS 165 Introduction to World Literature
CLS 203 African Studies
CLS 258 Women's Literature I
CLS 259 Women's Literature II
CLS 260 World Literature I
CLS 335 Latino Literature in the U.S.
COM 250 Intercultural Communication
CRJ 360 Race, Ethnicity, and Criminal Justice
ECE 407 Diversity Perspectives in Early Childhood Education
EDA/EDE 230 Inclusive Classrooms
EDA/EDR 341 Inclusion and Reading in the Content Area
EDE 352 Self Group Processes in Diverse Classrooms
ENG/LAN 382 Teaching English Language Learners (ELL's) PK-12
ESP 324 Latinos in the U.S.
ESP 333 Latina Writing
ESP 335 Latino Literature in the U.S.
GEO 204 Introduction to Urban Studies
GEO 312 Urban Geography
HEA 110 Transcultural Health
HIS 362 Violence in America
HIS 373 African-American History
HIS 424 World Communism
HIS 451 Women in America
HON 312 Education Systems and Social Influence
KIN 246 Sport, Culture, and Society
KIN 254 Psychosocial Aspects of Physical Disabilities
LIN 211 Language Communities in the U.S.
LIT 213 Asian American Literature
LIT 303 Introduction to Multiethnic Literature
MHL 125 Perspectives in Jazz
MUE 332 Music Methods and Materials II
NSG 109 Health Issues of Women
NTD 200 Nutrition and Culture
PHI 130 Religion in the United States
PHI 180 Introduction to Ethics
PHI 373 Business Ethics
PHI 390 Women and Religion
PSC 101 The Politics of Diversity in the United States
PSC 301 Gender and Politics
PSC 323 The Politics of Race, Class, and Gender
PSC 340 Latin American Cultures
PSC 343 Culture and Politics of Asia
SCE 350 Science Education in Secondary School
PSY 120 Multicultural Psychology
PSY 448 Field Experience in Psychology III
PSY 449 Field Experience in Psychology IV
SWO 225 Race Relations
SWO 351 Human Behavior in Social Environment II
THA 250 Race and Gender in American Theatre
WOS 225 Women Today: An Introduction to Women's Studies
WOS 250 Women's Self-Reflections in Writing, Art, and Music
WOS 305 Intellectual Roots of Western Feminism
WOS 315 Third-World Women
WOS 335 Gender and Science
WRH 210 Multicultural Writing

Approved Interdisciplinary Courses

ACC 300 Fraud Examination for Managers
AMS 200 American Civilization
AMS 250 Myths and Modernization
CLS 201 Classical Mythology in the 20th Century
CLS 270 Life, Death, and Disease
CLS 280 Languages of Modernism: Film, Art, and Theatre
CLS 329 Gender and Peace
CLS 352 Modernity/Postmodernity
CLS 368 Culture, Myth, and Society
CLS 371 Law, Literature, and Communication
COM 340 Political Communication
DAN 300 Controversial Bodies: Visions of Beauty
ECO 344 American Economic Experience
EDF 255 Evolution of Schooling in the United States
EDF 300 Democracy and Education
EFR 320 French Civilization (in English)
EGE 322 German Civilization (in English)
EGE 323 Austrian Civilization, 1848-1938
ENG 215 Views on Literacy
ENV 102 Humans and the Environment
ESP 300 Latin American Culture and Civilization (in English)
ERU 309 Soviet Russian Culture (in English)
ESP 300 Latin-American Culture and Civilization (in English)
ESP 319 Civilization of Spain (in English)
ESP 324 Latinos in the U.S.
ESP 362 New World: America
ESS 102 Humans and the Environment
GEO 204 Introduction to Urban Studies
GER 321 German Civilization (in German)
HIS 302 Modern India
HIS 305 Modern China
HIS 306 Chinese Civilization
HIS 308 An Introduction to the Islamic World
HIS 329 Gender and Peace
HON 110 Leadership Lessons and Civic Engagement Through Film
HON 320 Global Issues
HON 351 Honors Seminar
HON 352 Seminar
HON 381 Symposium in Arts and Humanities
HON 382 Symposium in Social and Behavioral Sciences
HON 451 Honors Seminar
HON 452 Honors Seminar
HON 490 Capstone Project
KIN 246 Sport, Culture, and Society
LIT 250 Victorian Attitudes
LIT 309 Martin Luther King
LIT 329 Medieval Women's Culture
LIT 370 Urbanism and Modern Imagination
MAT 301 The Scientific Revolution
MHL 201 Form and Style in the Arts
MHL 212 Music History III
MHL 301 Music and the Related Arts
MTC 101 Music Matters
NSG 222 Transcultural Health Delivery
PHI 102 Introduction to Religious Studies
PHI 174 Principles of the Arts
PHI 330 Introduction to Meaning
PHI 371 Biomedical Ethics
PSC 304 Introduction to Urban Studies
PSC 318 International Political Economy
SCB 102 Humans and the Environment
SCB 210 The Origin of Life and the Universe
SMD 210 Psychosocial Perspectives of Sport/Recreational Injuries
SOC 349 Perspectives on Mental Illness
SSC 200 Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies
SSC 201 Global Perspectives
SWO 225 Race Relations
WOS 225 Women Today: An Introduction to Women's Studies
WOS 250 Women's Self Reflections in Writing, Art, and Music
WOS 276 Sexual Identity and Culture
WOS 315 Third-World Women
WOS 329 Gender and Peace
WOS 335 Gender and Science
WOS 350 Lesbian Studies
WOS 405 Feminist Theory

Approved Writing Emphasis

ACC 410 Directed Studies in Accounting
ANT 312 Medical Anthropology
ANT 364 Archaeology of Ancient North America
ARH 210 Non-Western Art
ARH 211 Art of Egypt
ARH 383 Art of Middle Ages
ARH 386 Modern Art Seminar
ARH 389 Art of Spain
ART 112 Color and Design
BIO 310 Biostatistical Applications
BIO 440 Human Genetics
CLS 165 Introduction to World Literature
CLS 201 Classical Greco Roman Myth 20th Century
CLS 260 World Literature I
CLS 261 World Literature II
CLS 270 Life, Death, and Disease
CLS 361 Modern World Drama
CLS 362 World Literature – Modern Fiction
CLS 367 Classical Greco Roman Mythology
CLS 368 Greco Roman, Culture, Myth, and Society
CLS 369 Literature and Film
CLS 371 Law and Disorder in Literature
COM 404 Rhetorical Theory and Criticism
COM 405 Argumentation and Debate
COM 415 Language, Thought, and Behavior
COM 440 Friendship Communication
COM 445 Family Communication
CRW 201 Introduction to Creative Writing
CRW 202 Creative Writing I
CRW 203 Creative Writing II
CRW 301 Poetry Workshop I
CRW 302 Poetry  Workshop II
CRW 303 Short Story Workshop I
CRW 304 Short Story Workshop II
CRW 305 Essay Workshop
CSC 490 Independent Project in Computer Science
CSC 499 Independent Study in Computer Science
DAN 344 History of Dance
ECE 231 Child Development (2-5 Years)
ECE 232 Preschool Learning Environment
ECE 405 Administration and Supervision of Early Childhood Programs
ECE 407 Diversity Perspectives in Early Childhood Education
ECO 344 American Economic Experience
ECO 350 Urban Economics
EDA 302 Field Experience Seminar: High Incidence
EDA 307 Families and Special Education
EDE 200 Theory and Field Experiences in Elementary Education
EDE 352 Self and Group Processes in the Diverse Classroom
EDR 302 Teaching the Language Arts
EDR 304 Teaching the Language Arts Pre-K–4
EDR 306 Teaching Language Arts 4-8
EGE 405 A Survey of German Film
EGP 220 Theory and Field Experiences – Early Grades
EGP 322 Pre-K Methods and Field
EGP 402 Engaging Learners: Integrating Academic/Social Development for High Achieving Equitable Classrooms
ENG 194 Conventions of Reading and Writing
ENG 204 Practical Prose Composition
ENG 215 Views on Literacy
ENG 270 Publishing
ENG 295 Histories and Texts
ENG 296 Theory, Meaning, and Value
ENG 304 Essay Workshop
ENG 320 Writing and Computers
ENG 368 Business and Organizational Writing
ENG 371 Technical Writing
ENG 375 Strategies for Writing in the Workplace
ENG 397 Writing Tutoring
ENG 400 Research Seminar
ENV 455 Environmental Health Seminar
ERU 309 Russian Culture
ESP 300 Latin American Culture and Civilization
ESS 201 Field Geology
ESS 204 Historical Geology
ESS 331 Introduction to Paleontology
FIN 375 Contemporary Financial Issues
FLM 200 Introduction to Film
FLM 201 American Film
FLM 202 American Themes
FRE 301 Advanced Grammar and Stylistics
GEO 310 Population Problems
GEO 400 Senior Seminar in Geography
GER 405 A Survey of German Film
HEA 301 Health for the Elementary Grades
HEA 306 Curriculum and Instruction
HEA 310 Love and Marriage
HEA 315 Mind, Body, and Health
HEA 342 Program, Planning, and Evaluation
HEA 420 Health Marketing and Communication
HEA 440 School Health Programs
HEA 472 Mechanical Ventilation
HEA 478 Respiratory Therapy Seminar I
HIS 300 Varieties of History
HIS 366 The Turbulent Sixties
HIS 400 Seminar
HIS 451 Women in America
HON 351 Honors Seminar
HON 352 Honors Seminar
HON 381 Symposium in Arts and Humanities
HON 382 Symposium in Social and Behavioral Sciences
HON 451 Honors Seminar
HON 452 Honors Seminar
HON 490 Senior Project
JRN 225 Newswriting
JRN 315 Magazine Article Writing
KIN 352 Applied Exercise Physiology
LIN 360 Philosophy of Language
LIT 165 Topics in Literature
LIT 202 Afro-American Literature I
LIT 203 Afro-American Literature II
LIT 204 Black Women Writers in America
LIT 213 Asian American Literature
LIT 230 English Literature I
LIT 231 English Literature II
LIT 272 New Fiction
LIT 274 Feminist Poetry
LIT 302 Development of the American Novel
LIT 303 Introduction to Multiethnic Literature
LIT 306 Modern American Novel
LIT 335 Shakespeare I
LIT 336 Shakespeare II
LIT 337 Literature of the Enlightenment
LIT 338 Restoration and 18th Century Drama
LIT 339 18th Century British Novel
LIT 340 The Romantic Movement
LIT 342 Victorian Literature
LIT 370 Urbanism and Imagination
MAT 301 The Scientific Revolution
MAT 354 Techniques of Teaching Secondary School Mathematics
MAT 401 History of Mathematics
MGP 220 Field Experiences and the Middle-Level Environment
MGP 335 Teaching Social Studies in Middle Grades
MGT 498 Seminar in Management
MGT 313 Business and Society
MGT 499 Business Policy and Strategy
MHL 301 Music and the Related Arts
MHL 454 History of Opera
MHL 455 History of Orchestral Music
MHL 459 Topics in American Music
MUE 331 Music Methods and Materials I
MUE 332 Music Methods and Materials II
NSG 212 Nursing Theories and Concepts
NSG 311 Adaptation I
NSG 317 Women’s Sex and Sexuality
NSG 412 Advanced Adaptational Problems II
NTD 409 Professional Skills in Dietetics
PHI 102 Introduction to Religious Studies
PHI 310 New Religious Movements
PHI 330 Introduction to Meaning
PHI 340 Contemporary Moral Issues
PHY 310 Intermediate Physics I
PHY 320 Intermediate Physic II
PIA 423 Baroque Keyboard Literature
PIA 424 Classical Piano Literature
PIA 425 Romantic Piano Literature
PIA 426 20th Century Piano Literature
PIA 427 The Concerto
PSC 200 Political Analysis
PSC 230 Introduction to Political Thought
PSC 320 U.S. Foreign Policy
PSC 343 Culture and Politics of Asia
PSY 246 Research Methods in Psychology
PSY 365 Psychology of Women
PSY 376 Social Psychology Laboratory
PSY 384 Adult Development
SCE 350 Science Education in the Secondary School
SMD 210 Psychosocial Perspectives of Sport/Recreational Injury
SMD 414 History, Organization, and Administration of Sports Medicine
SPA 310 Business Spanish
SPP 106 Anatomy of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms
SPP 204 Speech and Language Development
SPP 350 Clinical Principles in Communicative Disorders
SSC 331 Teaching Citizenship Education in Secondary Schools
SWO 300 Family Systems
SWO 351 Human Behavior in Social Environment II
THA 306 History of Theatre/Drama II
THA 307 History of Theatre/Drama III
THA 309 Trends in Contemporary Theatre
WOS 225 Women Today: An Introduction to Women’s Studies
WOS 250 Self Reflections in Writing, Art, and Music
WRH 205 Composing Cyberspace
WRH 210 Multicultural Writing
WRH 305 Images of School in Film

NOTE: There are particular honors courses that have been approved as interdisciplinary at the 300 and 400 levels. Honors students should discuss these courses with the director of the honors program.

Language and Culture Requirements for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Music Degree and Certain B.S. Degree Candidates

  1. West Chester University believes that college students today require exposure to global cultures, and the University integrates this belief into courses and programs in various ways. Departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, as well as the College of Business and Public Affairs, in particular, see a need for students earning bachelor of arts degrees to gain competency in language and cultures as a critical aspect of their education. The University provides options for these students based on varying levels of language competency deemed appropriate by major departments for study in their field. Questions regarding language requirements should be directed to the department chairperson.
    A number of B.A. degree programs require a language proficiency gained from completing the second half of the intermediate year (202) of a language. At this level, students may be expected to have a working knowledge of the language and culture of a country. These programs are as follows:
    Biology
    English
    Languages and Cultures (in a second language)
    History
    Liberal Studies
    Mathematics (limited to French, German, and Russian)
    Political Science (B.A. in international relations only)
  2. Other B.A. degree programs offer students the following options:

    1. demonstrating language proficiency through the intermediate level (202) or
    2. demonstrating language proficiency through the Elementary II (102) level of a language and further acquiring a cultural foundation through taking three culture cluster courses within the same language area. This option is available for the following languages: American Sign Language, French, German, Greek, Italian, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish, which have approved sets of associated culture cluster courses. It is not necessary for students to complete the Elementary II (102) level before taking culture cluster courses.

    While this option does not give students the depth and focus of language study, the three courses will help them understand a culture. (In this option, students may elect to further their language skills by taking an additional semester of the language, plus two culture cluster courses.)

    Degree programs offering the culture cluster option are as follows:

    Anthropology

    Communication
    Communicative Disorders
    Economics (B.A. only)
    Geography (B.A. only)
    Philosophy
    Political Science (B.A. general and public management only)
    Psychology
    Sociology
    Theatre Arts

  3. Some B.S. degree programs also require a language. Students should see their advisers.
  4. The Department of Languages and Cultures handles testing and placement.

  5. Course substitutions to the language requirement of a department will be granted if the student meets one of the following criteria:
    1. The student is able to demonstrate proficiency through successful testing by the Department of Languages and Cultures.
    2. The student holds a diploma from a secondary education institution in another country. This institution must be at least the equivalent of a U.S. high school, and instruction must be in a language other than English.

     

  6. Students who may request course substitutions because of a disability should refer to pages 33-34, "Services for Students with Disabilities."
  7. Students should take note of the policies regarding taking courses out of sequence; see page 47.

Language Culture Clusters

Of the three required culture cluster courses, students who choose that option may take no more than two in the same department, except that only one may be taken in the department in which they major. Students are encouraged to begin taking their culture cluster courses as soon as possible. The 201 level of language courses is acceptable for use as one of the three culture cluster courses. Any exceptions to these conditions must be etitioned. A student may not use one course to simultaneously fulfill a general education distributive requirement and a culture cluster requirement.

  1. American Sign Language
    Approved courses:
    COM 295, KIN 254, KIN 357
  2. Classical Civilization (Latin or Greek)
    Approved courses:
    ARH 382, CLS 201, CLS 367, CLS 368, HIS 318, HIS 319,PHI 270, PHI 271
  3. France and Francophone Area (French)
    Approved courses:
    ARH 383, ARH 385, EFR 320, EFR 330, EFR 350, EFR 401, GEO 303, HIS 328, HIS 427, HIS 435, PHI 415, PSC 342
  4. Germany (German)
    Approved courses:
    EGE 322, EGE 323, EGE 403, EGE 404, EGE 405, EGE 408, EGE 409, GEO 303, HIS 323,HIS 423, HIS 435, PHI 272, PHI 273, PSC 342
  5. Italy (Italian)
    Approved courses:
    ARH 384, EIT 321, EIT 360, GEO 303, PSC 342
  6. Russia and Eastern Europe (Russian or an Eastern European language)
    Approved courses:
    ERU 309, ERU 310, GEO 304, HIS 324, HIS 425, PSC 346
  7. Spanish (Spanish or Portuguese)
    Approved courses:
    ANT 224, ANT 322, ANT 324, ANT 362, ARH 389, CLS 311, CLS 333,CLS 334, ESP 300, ESP 305, ESP 306, ESP 307, ESP 309, ESP 311, ESP 318, ESP 319, ESP 324, ESP 333, ESP 334, ESP 355, ESP 403, GEO 302, HIS 315, HIS 316, HIS 317, PSC 340