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RECAP 2014

Sessions

Contact Us  

RECAP 2014

Address:
Anderson Hall, Room 020
725 S. Church Street
West Chester, PA 19383


Email: RECAP@wcupa.edu

  • Resources for the Electronic Classroom: A Faculty-Student Partnership
    May 15th, 2014 | ConferenceMay 16th, 2014 | Workshops

  • Resources for the Electronic Classroom: A Faculty-Student Partnership
    May 15th, 2014 | ConferenceMay 16th, 2014 | Workshops

  • Resources for the Electronic Classroom: A Faculty-Student Partnership
    May 15th, 2014 | ConferenceMay 16th, 2014 | Workshops

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Sessions

The RECAP Planning and Content teams identified six session themes that represent current topics in education that we believe will make RECAP 2014 a resourceful event. Each conference session is aligned with a theme.

Session Themes

Mobile Pedagogy Mobile Pedagogy

About These Sessions

Not too long ago personal computers were new and it was unclear how they would impact education. Now smartphone and tablet (iPads, Android, Windows Surface) use is on the rise as students and faculty bring them to campus. Some have started experimenting with this technology in teaching and learning both inside and outside the classroom. How can we take the capabilities these devices bring to our educational models to contribute to learning? What are the benefits? What are the challenges?

Sessions

9:30AM –
10:30AM
Sykes 115

Ok Class…Google Glass in Education

Presenter: Chris Penny

Co-presenter(s): Christine DiPaulo, Jordan Schugar

Google Glass has sparked a mix of curiosity and skepticism in education. Learn how Google Certified Teachers are using Google Glass in the classroom.

10:40AM –
11:40AM
Sykes 252

Knowledge, Skills, and Assessment: Using iPad technology

Presenter: Leonora Foels

An overview of the process in which the mini iPad was integrated into an undergraduate skills building course that was designed to evaluate core course competencies. Students utilize the mini iPad technology in one to one and group work with peers to record mock client sessions. The iPad recorded sessions allow students to receive clear and concise feedback regarding their interviewing abilities, and enhance their learning through the use of reflective practices via the latest technology. Benefits and challenges of this pedagogy inside the class will be discussed along with plans to transfer this educational approach beyond the walls of the classroom.

2:10PM –
3:10PM
Sykes 209

Mobile Design Process and Understanding the User

Presenter: James Pannafino

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a mobile device.

Ever wonder what went into the planning and ideation of a mobile app design? This session will cover how to define the user, what design processes to follow and explain some basic design technology to help conceptualize a mobile app design. Educators and staff interested in learning about integrating interactive design techniques into their workflow or classroom may be interested in this session. Note: This is an introductory session meant to be accessible to all disciplines and is not a coding session.

3:20PM –
4:20PM
Sykes 115

Google Glass in the Classroom

Presenter: Michael Pearson

Based on the actual use of Google Glass as part of a senior seminar, this session will demonstrate Google Glass itself (Explorer Edition) and the use of the Android 4g smartphone app for effective use of Google Glass. In addition, we will demonstrate at least two Google Glass programs being used in the classroom. One is the ability to broadcast live video from Google Glass and the other is a program (not yet approved by Google Glass) that allows the wearer to preview PowerPoint slides and notes during a presentation. This RECAP Demonstration session will discuss the successes and failures faced during the semester and share ideas for the future.

4:30PM –
5:30PM
Sykes 210

I’m Going Mobile: Using Livecode to Create Multimedia / Apps for Mobile Devices

Presenter: Marc Jacoby

LiveCode is a development environment with a scripting language reminiscent of HyperTalk. What’s most exciting is that LiveCode developed apps that can run on iOS, Android, Mac OS X, Windows and Linux. It can be used for development of mobile, desktop and server applications. This clinic session will introduce LiveCode as a potential tool for teachers looking to develop their own custom multimedia and applications for smartphones and tablets. Topics will include an overview of the software and tools, creating user interface objects such as buttons and text fields, audio, video and animation, and the fundamentals of LiveCode programing.

Engaging Students Engaging Students

About These Sessions

Engaging students in the learning process can result in a positive impact on learning outcomes. Technology is a tool that can bring students from the sideline into the game as active participants. In this track presenters will showcase examples of how they have been able to engage students with the inclusion of technology in their courses.

Sessions

9:30AM –
10:30AM
Sykes 209

Beyond the Flip: How to Promote Student Self-Regulation in Online Learning Environments

Presenter: Jane Kenney

Co-presenter(s): Ellen Newcombe

For the past eight semesters, the presenters have conducted an action research study focusing on the use of a blended or hybrid approach to flip instruction in an undergraduate education course. Blended approaches combine online with face-to-face instruction and have been found to increase student preparation and engagement. Recent research is finding that online instructional formats are more autonomous learning situations requiring more active student involvement and self-direction. Self-regulation or active control of one’s own learning involves skills such as time management and self-discipline. Students who are not accustomed to active styles of instruction can find online contexts problematic unless support is provided by the instructor. When designing online courses, instructors can sometimes overlook these important learning tools. The presenters began investigating students’ self-regulation skills in determining their satisfaction and success in using the hybrid, flipped technique as well as the types of learning supports that helped them become successful, self-regulated online learners. These research findings will be discussed.

9:30AM –
10:30AM
Sykes 252

Student Engagement: A View from Virtual Worlds

Presenter: Joel Keener

Would you like to re-create your classroom? Here is an idea; Second Life is a 3D virtual world that offers educators the opportunity to provide virtual spaces, activities and resources not available in the physical classroom. In my experience, students in my Second Life courses are more engaged and have improved attendance. This session will take you as participant newcomer into the 3D virtual world of Second Life. This session will provide a brief overview of the history of Second Life and a recap of the second life courses I have taught at Cheyney University. Lessons learned and student feedback will be shared. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss the possible uses of virtual worlds in their own courses.

9:30AM –
10:30AM
Sykes Ballroom

Twitter in Higher Education 101

Presenter: Marc Drumm

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a laptop.

Believe it or not, there’s more to Twitter than pictures of everyone’s breakfast. The first part of this workshop will be hands-on: users will sign-up for an account and learn the basics (tweeting, retweeting, replying, following, and more). After that, we’ll discuss using Twitter as a tool for collaboration and gathering information. Finally, we’ll look at examples of how higher education faculty are integrating Twitter into their courses to engage their students.

10:40AM –
11:40AM
Sykes 209

Inverting the General Chemistry Experience at Shippensburg University

Presenter: Curtis Zaleski

Over the past two academic years I have inverted (or flipped) my General Chemistry I and II classes at Shippensburg University. Video lectures are posted online, and class time now focuses on actively engaging the students in problem solving exercises. Students come to class with notes and questions from the videos and are better prepared for the day’s topics than in a standard lecture course. Student grades have dramatically improved during the last two years (15% increase in the average score) and the DFW rates have fallen from 31% (standard lecture) to 14% (inverted). This session will provide a brief introduction to the inverted program at SU, and the focus of the conversation will be devoted to how to invert a class, technology options, best practices, and pitfalls to avoid. The goal of the session is to have experienced “inverters” share their knowledge with faculty considering the idea and for experienced faculty members to learn new techniques and approaches from others.

10:40AM –
11:40AM
Sykes 210

Using Social Bookmarking as a Platform for Building Collaborative Online Toolkits that Last Beyond the Course.

Presenter: Michelle Fisher

Co-presenter(s): Beatrice Adera, Michelle Fisher

Social Bookmarking, Web Quests, and “share this resource” assignments have been a part of online learning for years. As Web 2.0 tools continue to improve and evolve, student collaboration becomes more efficient, less “clunky”, and more useful for students. In three graduate special education courses we adopted Pinterest as a platform to develop collaborative online “Tool Kits” where students could share resources for the given topic/issue with their peers. The benefit of using Pinterest over a D2L discussion board or simply having the students review and collect resources and share via a document is that the students are directly connected to each other and as they continue to grow as professionals long after the course is over. Students/Alumni can continue to add, share and connect with their peers in the field in a way that is not possible through D2L or a single document. We will walk participants through the assignment, sharing set up and student instructions.

2:10PM –
3:10PM
Sykes 252

Quizlet: An Interactive Teaching Tool for Teaching and Learning

Presenter: Nurun Begum

Co-presenter(s): Mahfuzul Khondaker

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a laptop.

Quizlet is an interactive teaching tool that makes learning easy, fun and interesting for all learners. In this presentation, the presenters will focus on how instructors can use Quizlet for helping students to learn and assess the contents, how instructors can create a study set and arrange a study session. The presenters have used Quizlet the last two years and found it effective and helpful. In this presentation the presenters will share the experience as well.

2:10PM –
3:10PM
Sykes 210

Teaching Tolerance Through Technology: Using Practitioner-Based Training Techniques in the Classroom to Educate CJ Students about Mental Illness

Presenter: Michele P Bratina

Co-presenter(s): Student , Student

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a laptop.

In terms of educating today's criminal justice students about unique, albeit controversial, populations--particularly, persons with severe and persistent mental illness, instructors would benefit from exploring unique strategies to more effectively engage and challenge today’s tech-savvy learners. The purpose of this session is to outline in detail the use of Dr. Patricia Deegan's audio-based Hearing Distressing Voices training among upper-level criminal justice students, many of who aspire to have careers in law enforcement. The Presenter and her students will explain how the adaptation of this practitioner-based training can be used to engage students in several areas, including their direct exposure to the challenges faced by persons with severe mental illness despite the confines of a classroom, and the incorporation of peer-to-peer teaching and a writing assignment wholly based on the insight gained from critical reflection of the voice-hearing experience.

2:10PM –
3:10PM
Sykes 115

Using GoReact as a Tool for Recording and Evaluating Oral Presentations

Presenter: Meghan Mahoney

Co-presenter(s): Philip Thompsen, Bessie Lawton

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a laptop and a mobile device.

In summer 2013, Drs. Meghan Mahoney, Philip Thompsen , and Bessie Lawton worked in collaboration with two other Communication Studies professors to transition SPK 208 (Public Speaking) into a hybrid format. The class launched in Spring 2014 with five sections running. One of the technologies being tested for this course redesign is GoReact, which allows for simultaneous recording, evaluation, and peer critique of student oral presentations. The collaborators will discuss the benefits and drawbacks of using this technology as a tool for evaluating oral presentations, as well as for engaging students in critiquing and improving presentations. Our goal for this session is to share our learning process in using this technological tool. We hope to share lessons we learned in the process of choosing the platform, platform features that are useful, and potential uses for courses that have graded oral presentations.

3:20PM –
4:20PM
Sykes 254

Interactive Print through Augmented Reality

Presenter: Mark Snyder

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a mobile device.

Many educators are beginning to explore the use of augmented reality to make learning more interesting for their students. But how many actually engage their students by having them create their own interactive applications using augmented reality technology? This session will demonstrate examples of augmented reality and share how Graphic Communication students at Millersville University combined traditional print technology with augmented reality to generate their own versions of interactive print media. In this case, students produce printed materials and then link their images to supplemental online information they created that can be can accessed wirelessly using mobile phones, iPads or other smart devices. This process typically involves some sort of image recognition technology and then links to websites, a database of information, or videos. Bring your own 'smart' devices to try this for yourself.

3:20PM –
4:20PM
Sykes 210

To Post or Not To Post?: Effective Professor Participation in Online Discussions

Presenter: Daniel Burdick

Most online instructors have had this question come to mind when navigating online discussions. Logically, it seems like a pedagogically sound idea to post to the week's discussion on a regular basis. If this is true, what would be the optimal number of posts each week from the instructor to promote student engagement? Also, it is probably not possible to respond to each student each week. So, how does an instructor track to which students they have replied over the course of the semester? However, the counter-intuitive approach of the instructor posting infrequently to the discussion board each week may have some benefit. While monitoring the discussion occurs in the background, students can establish an online community that answers their peers in a full and meaningful way. In fact, how many times have you, as an instructor, found total silence online after a post? This technique can help the discussion continue rather than come to a stop. We will explore both approaches.

4:30PM –
5:30PM
Sykes 252

Collaborative Online Research and Learning

Presenter: Andrew Beyer

Co-presenter(s): Jamie McMenamin

Resources: View File

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a laptop and a mobile device.

Learning objectives: To enhance effective collaboration of students by: (1) Integrating several different teaching and learning styles, thereby providing a more inclusive learning format, (2) Structured by the professors, but led by the students fostering independent thinking and active learning, and (3) Promoting interdependence by having students share the division of labor by formulating roles and task that compel students to reach accord. CORAL is a multidisciplinary model for the integration of technology with collaborative teaching and learning. Faculty members from the Departments of Psychology (College of Arts & Science) and Management (College of Business) at West Chester University of Pennsylvania have implemented the CORAL platform to focus on the management and evaluation of high performance teams. The format allows students to work together in teams, providing active engagement in developing their collaboratively written projects.

4:30PM –
5:30PM
Sykes 209

Tweeting Away: Creating Instructional Discourse in an Online Graduate Class.

Presenter: Michelle Fisher

Co-presenter(s): Vicki McGinley, Michelle Fisher

Participants will learn how to design and implement a debate using Twitter. EDA580 (Contemporary Issues in Special Education) provides students with the concentrated study of current special education issues, such as Least Restrictive Environment, Merging General and Special Education, Highly Qualified Teachers, etc. Various assignments and assessments include research essays, discussion boards, debates and discussions and readings. Students gain an understanding of factors inherent in special education from those in contact with students with disabilities. Problem solving, interaction, and dialogue are strongly emphasized. Students develop and extend their knowledge base and develop skills of reflective inquiry. In this session we will present current research on the use of Twitter in Higher Education classrooms. We will present the use of Twitter as a vehicle for debate. We will describe the steps in the development of the assignment through the implementation and student outcomes.

Digital Assessment Digital Assessment

About These Sessions

With an increase of online resources being used to engage students, the effectiveness of traditional assessment methods is in question. The Digital Assessment track will provide insight on some of the latest techniques being used to more accurately evaluate student performance.

Sessions

9:30AM –
10:30AM
Sykes 210

Grading Online Using Turnitin for Large and Small Classes Alike

Presenter: Larry Udell

Turnitin on D2L allows faculty to grade student papers online. This feature has several distinct advantages, including instant feedback to students, integration with the D2L gradebook, security, and potentially high quality feedback. This session will elaborate on these advantages, and illustrate some techniques for making the most of them. We will discuss how to use the Dropbox on D2L, the use of rubrics and Quickmarks (TM), and how best to grade efficiently using these tools.

10:40AM –
11:40AM
Sykes 255

Electronic Portfolios for Internships, Practicums, and Student Teaching

Presenter: Richard Mehrenberg

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a laptop.

Many college courses require students to gain real world experience. As supervisors, it is sometimes difficult to accurately assess our students' level of knowledge and skill that arise from such activities. This workshop will provide participants with the rationale, tools, and examples associated with electronic portfolios to be used as an effective assessment tool.

3:20PM –
4:20PM
Sykes 209

Online Proctoring of Distance Education Exams

Presenter: Marc Drumm

Faculty have always been concerned about preserving the integrity of their exams, but how do you maintain that integrity after switching to an online format? This session will look at how West Chester University has partnered with Examity, an online proctoring service that utilizes the technology built into most modern computers to monitor exams and deter cheating. We’ll discuss how it works, the experience from the students’ perspective, and how effective this technology has been.

4:30PM –
5:30PM
Sykes 254

Getting Results with MyWritingLab: Tools and Metrics for the Effective Teaching of Writing, Grammar, and Research

Presenter: Michelle Blake

Co-presenter(s): Denise Donaghue

Unlike standard course management systems like D2L and Blackboard that give instructors tools to manage generic course interactions, MyWritingLab gives instructors TOOLS geared specifically toward writing. For example, MWL lets instructors and students give/get feedback on papers from peers, instructors, and tutors; lets instructors build assignments and tests from thousands of questions and hundreds of videos; and gives instructors many grading options, from rubrics to instant exercise and quiz grading to online paper grading. In addition, MWL offers many METRICS (e.g., item analysis) that empower both instructors and students to regularly measure progress and adjust activities to maximize learning. The individualized Learning Path of each student additionally uses adaptive technology to tweak what the student is working on, based on his or her performance (like Netflix learns what you like). These tools and metrics, in short, let students and teachers get the results they want.

Conquering the Content Conquering the Content

About These Sessions

Today course content comes in a variety of digital formats. Options range from Interactive Demonstrations, Simulations, and Interactive Online Presentations to Course Cartridges, E-Books, and Question Pools. Finding the right balance both online and in the physical classroom can be challenging. Conquering the Content will demonstrate effective uses of a variety of content presentation options and publisher resources to help you gain control of your content.

Sessions

2:10PM –
3:10PM
Sykes 254

Screencast your Lessons using PowerPoint!

Presenter: Michael Ruffini

This presentation explores how screencasting can engage student learning. Instructional applications with a focus on the flipped classroom, steps in creating a screencast using PowerPoint, and screencasting resources will be discussed.

Technology and Universal Design Technology and Universal Design

About These Sessions

Advances in technology and the learning sciences have made “on-the-fly” individualization of curricula possible in practical, cost-effective ways. Effective instructors are creative and resourceful in designing flexible learning environments that address the variability of learners using a range of high-tech and low-tech solutions. In this session, presenters may share and explore the different uses of and challenges of using technology to engage all learners in face to face, online and blended classrooms.

Sessions

9:30AM –
10:30AM
Sykes 254

The Online Community Life Cycle

Presenter: Lauren Edgell

This session explores the sustainability of online communities and discusses the life cycle as they evolve through the following stages: inception, creation, growth, maturation, mitosis, and death. Online communities are highly dynamic. Their life cycle is not linear, but cyclical in nature and the needs of the community differ in each phase. Critical implications of the online community life cycle as they pertain to the sustainability of online communities are discussed. These implications include the importance of membership size, engagement, intentional facilitation, perceived value, and analytics.

10:40AM –
11:40AM
Sykes 254

Usability 101: Designing Online Content for All Users

Presenter: Lisa Dise

In this session we will explore how to present content online in a way that is accessible for all users. We will be looking at proper use of images, text, color, file types and looking at the idea of “chunking” online materials. Creating accessible content for users with disabilities will also be touched upon in this session.

2:10PM –
3:10PM
Sykes 255

Preliminary empirical evidence for flipped classroom method: Does it really make a difference all the time?

Presenter: Junko Yamamoto

Co-presenter(s): Stephen Larson

Resources: Flipping the College Spreadsheet Skills Classroom: Initial Empirical Results

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a mobile device.

Flipping classroom is one of the current topics in the field of instructional technology. However, does it really make a difference? The presenters compared aggregate scores of 20 assignments between the traditional lecture group (N=55) and the flipped group (N=70). The preliminary finding indicated that there is no statistical difference in the scores between the two groups. However, 90% of the flipped group liked the approach. The presenters explain the context of the study and the directions for future investigation. Participants are encouraged to read the presenters’ paper from this link before attending to the session http://www.cisjournal.org/journalofcomputing/archive/vol4no10/vol4no10_3.pdf

3:20PM –
4:20PM
Sykes 255

Connecting Students, Adobe Connect, and the Polar Vortex.

Presenter: Michele Mislevy

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a laptop and a mobile device.

Come see how the polar vortex and the snowstorms of 2014 forced faculty to create learning experiences outside of the box. Participants will learn how web conferencing programs such as Adobe Connect can be used to bring together individuals from different locations and mobile devices into a single, virtual learning space. Connect has a synchronous way for faculty to interact with and present material to students and can enable students to present to their peers as well. It can be used to record lectures and presentations for later viewing. Alternatives to Adobe Connect will also be reviewed.

4:30PM –
5:30PM
Sykes 255

Mini MOOC Lessons Learned: Opportunities and Challenges

Presenter: Anita Foeman

Co-presenter(s): Bessie Lawton, Phil Thompsen

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a laptop.

In late October 2013, Drs. Philip Thompsen , Bessie Lawton, and Anita Foeman worked in collaboration to pilot a Small Open Access Project (SOAP) entitled “A World of Difference: Exploring Intercultural Communication.” The class launched on the Udemy platform in late October. By early December, nearly 300 participants from around the world had joined the course, with more registering daily. These open access modules are also being used as a small part of the online for-credit class in Intercultural Communication (Com 250), and the materials are playing multiple roles in educating our students, marketing the university, and reaching potential off-campus constituents. The collaborators believe that the potential of this educational approach is boundless and represents a new phase in access and global sharing. Our goal for this session is to share our process in conceptualizing this project, identifying an outlet, developing modules and planning for the future. We hope to share lessons we learned regarding institutional and technological considerations. We will also demonstrate elements of class development, design and instruction.

Developing the 4 C’s Developing the 4 C’s: Critical Thinking, Creative Thinking, Collaboration, Communication

About These Sessions

Critical thinking, creative thinking, collaboration and communication; all are skills that are increasingly important and necessary for students to succeed as citizens, workers and leaders in a global society. How are you infusing innovation and using technology to develop these higher order thinking and communication skills in students?

Sessions

9:30AM –
10:30AM
Sykes 255

Transforming Education using Mobile Pedagogy

Presenter: David Bolton

The promise of educational technology has been to improve education, with improving education has often been defined as increasing achievement on tests. The problem with this calculus is that the goals for the use of educational technology go beyond this simple measure of success. The promise of educational technology is that of increasing students’ level of thinking through the transformation of the educational process itself. Unfortunately, educational technology is rarely used to transform the educational process, but often adds another layer on to the top of traditional educational processes. This presentation will examine the promises of educational technology, such as developing higher-order thinking skills in students, and will discuss the reasons these promises have not been met. After the topic has been presented, a discussion will be conducted with the audience.

10:40AM –
11:40AM
Sykes 115

Marrying old and new technologies while developing the 4 Cs

Presenter: Tara Wink

Co-presenter(s): Janneken Smucker

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a laptop and a mobile device.

Developing the 4 Cs is challenging, yet with our assignment making innovative use of campus resources, they have blossomed. We asked upper-level history students to focus on one aspect of WCU’s past to create a dynamic website drawing on FHG Library’s Special Collections. The resulting websites accomplish many goals, directly correlating with the 4 Cs. This session will inspire faculty across disciplines to take risks by creating student-directed, collaborative assignments. By allowing students to take ownership through decision making, leadership, and group accountability, they create projects they feel proud to share. We will elaborate on the benefits and challenges of our approach and demonstrate the collaborative processes undergirding the assignment. Participants will explore the websites and digitized images to discover ways to develop similar projects resulting in critical and creative thinkers who have the skills necessary to collaborate and communicate well in the workforce.

3:20PM –
4:20PM
Sykes 252

Digital Tinkering: Teaching The Art of Creative Dismantling

Presenter: Bill Broun

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a laptop.

Historically, the tinkerer is a shadowy, itinerant figure, normally at the edges of society, who scavenges, collects, pulls apart, and recombines technologies in occasionally imaginative ways. This colorful archetype offers some intriguing lessons for students of our digital world. In the classroom, students are often exposed to technologies through incremental, linear, from-the-ground-up teaching methods that miss learning opportunities afforded by playing with, and in many cases deliberately "breaking," completed objects. After exploring a few classroom and online "tinkering" experiences from East Stroudsburg University's professional and digital media writing program, the session will contemplate the power of tinkering more broadly as serious creative learning strategy in the university writing classroom and beyond.

4:30PM –
5:30PM
Sykes 115

Developing the 4Cs: Monitoring Feedback with a Backchannel Chat

Presenter: Tina Selvaggi

Co-presenter(s): Sally Winterton

Recommended Items: It is recommended that attendees bring a laptop and a mobile device.

This session presents collaboration and communication between teacher candidates and two professors at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Teacher candidates in two sections of Introduction to Language Arts participated in ongoing communication with the professors and each other through the use of a backchannel chat. Presenters will share the types of responses, questions, and interactions that took place throughout the semester, paying particular attention to creativity and critical thinking. Comparison of communication with and without technology will also be discussed.

Session Types

Conversation Session

About These Sessions

The focus of the conversation session is participant dialogue on a topic. The session begins with a brief 10 minute presentation on the topic followed by an active participant discussion, with a total session time of 60 minutes.

Option: Flip Your Session

Presenters choosing the Conversation Session have an additional Flip Your Session option available for their presentation. With this option the presenter submits a thought provoking video, paper, or article before the conference for interested attendees to review prior to the session. A link to the advance information (video, paper, article) will be provided on the RECAP website. The conversation session begins with a brief overview followed by participant dialogue expanding on the advance information provided.

Sharing/Demonstration Session

About These Sessions

Sharing/Demonstration sessions focus on sharing or modeling innovative uses of technology while allowing for interaction among participants. These sessions address "how-to" as well as "why-to." These sessions are 60 minutes in length.