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Senior Vice Provost

Probation and Dismissal

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Senior Vice Provost

Address:
Philips Memorial Hall, Room 008
700 South High Street
West Chester, PA 19383


Dr. Jeffery L. Osgood, Jr.
Senior Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies
610-738-0492
JOsgood@wcupa.edu


Andrea Grinwis
Academic Affairs Programs and Policies Manager
610-436-3551
AGrinwis@wcupa.edu

Probation and Dismissal

Your academic standing at the University is indicated by your cumulative grade point average (GPA). There are three categories of academic standing: good academic standing, probation, and dismissal. You remain in good academic standing as long as you maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 for all work taken at the University. Probation and dismissal are actions taken by the University when your GPA falls below an acceptable level.

Forms Related to Academic Standing

Academic Recovery Plan Dismissal Appeal Form

An ARP is a requirement for any student placed on probation. See the Academic Recovery Plans section below for further details.

A Dismissal Appeal Form is used to appeal an academic dismissal from the university. See the Academic Dismissal section below for further details.

Academic Probation

Academic Probation is defined as "a trial period during which a student, whose cumulative GPA has fallen below acceptable standards, must bring his or her average up or be dismissed from the University." Once on probation, you have one full-time semester to raise your GPA back to 2.00. For complete details on academic probation, please refer to the Undergraduate Catalog.

How will I be notified that I am on academic probation?

If you are placed on Academic Probation, a letter will be mailed to your home address to alert you to this change in your academic standing. Be sure to make the Office of the Registrar aware of any changes to your mailing address, so you do not miss any important correspondence from the university.

Once on academic probation, how many semesters do I have to bring my GPA back to a 2.00?

You have one full-time semester to raise your GPA to a 2.00. Failure to do this will result in an Academic Dismissal.

How many times am I allowed to be on academic probation?

You may be placed on probation twice. Placement on probation for the third time will trigger an automatic dismissal.

Will academic probation prevent me from scheduling classes?

No, academic probation refers to your academic standing; it is not the same as a hold. However, if you do not meet the deadline to have an Academic Recovery Plan completed, you will receive a hold on your account. An ARP hold will prevent you from scheduling.

How does probation affect Financial Aid?

The rules about satisfactory academic progress for purposes of receiving financial aid and academic probation are very different. You must pass 67% of all attempted credits and have a 2.0 cumulative GPA after four semesters (including winter and summer sessions) in order to continue to receive federal financial aid. If you receive a state grant, you must pass 24 credits for every full-time academic year a state grant is received. If you worry you will be placed on academic probation, it is a good idea to speak with the Financial Aid Office to determine how your aid will be affected.

If I'm on probation, do I have to be a full-time student?

No, if you wish to drop to part-time, you may do so. In fact, if you are a full-time student on probation and you fear that you will soon be dismissed, you may wish to drop to part-time status. Any full-time student on probation, who does not return to good academic standing, but instead, drops to part-time status before the end of the semester, will automatically be placed on continued probation. Once you have been placed on continued probation, however, dropping to part-time will not protect you from dismissal. Once you are placed on continued probation, you must return to good academic standing or face dismissal from the university.

If I'm on probation, am I allowed to withdraw from a class?

Yes, your academic standing does not affect your ability to make changes to your schedule. Also, if you wish to withdraw from the University for a semester, you may do that, as well. As long as you are only out for one semester, you will not need to reapply in order to return. Keep in mind: you will still be on probation once you return.

Academic Recovery Plans (ARPs)

An Academic Recovery Plan (ARP) is an online form, completed in a meeting with your advisor, in which you outline your plan to raise your GPA back to an acceptable level (2.00 or above). An ARP is required if you have been placed on academic probation.

Will my advisor let me know that I need an Academic Recovery Plan?

No, it is your responsibility to be aware of your academic standing. If you are placed on academic probation, a letter will be mailed to your home address, alerting you to this fact. The letter will also discuss the need for an ARP. It is then your responsibility to contact your advisor and set up an appointment to have an ARP completed.

Once I complete an ARP, will I ever need one completed again?

Yes, you will need to have an ARP completed each time you are placed on probation (this includes continued probation, as well as pending probation).

Why does Financial Aid need to see my ARP?

If you are applying for an appeal of the federal financial aid academic progress policy, the Financial Aid Office may have asked for a copy of your ARP. If you have one, attach it to your Financial Aid Appeal Application. If you don’t, that’s fine – there is a section of the appeal form that your advisor can fill out in lieu of an ARP (“Academic Improvement Plan for Financial Aid Eligibility - Advisor Section”). It is important for the Appeal Committee to see that you have consulted your academic advisor and that you are making strides to recover a good academic standing at the University.

Academic Dismissal

If you have been placed on academic probation, and you are not able to raise your GPA to a 2.00 at the end of one full-time semester, you will be subject to Academic Dismissal from the University. For complete details on academic dismissal, please refer to the Undergraduate Catalog.

I was dismissed after my first semester, how is this possible?

Any full-time student, who earns a 0.00 cumulative GPA after his/her first semester at WCU, will receive an automatic dismissal. (This policy does not apply to students scheduled for fewer than 12 credits.)

Is there any way to prevent being dismissed?

If you are a full-time student on probation, you may wish to drop to part-time status. Any full-time student on probation, who does not return to good academic standing, but instead, drops to part-time status before the end of the semester, will automatically be placed on continued probation. Once you have been placed on continued probation, however, dropping to part-time will not protect you from dismissal. Once you are placed on continued probation, you must return to good academic standing or face dismissal from the university.

Can I appeal a dismissal?

Yes, a student who is subject to dismissal may appeal to the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs (Interim).

The Associate Provost may grant a semester on continued probation if:

  1. You have made progress towards good academic standing and
  2. It is both mathematically possible and probable that you will be able to reach a 2.00, by the end of the additional semester.

Appealing is a very informal process. Simply complete the Dismissal Appeal Form found here, and email the completed form to the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs (Interim). The Associate Provost will make a decision and respond within a few days.

Is there ever a time when a dismissal appeal is not possible?

An additional semester on continued probation will not be granted if:

  1. you were dismissed after receiving a 0.00 after your first semester or
  2. you were dismissed because you were placed on probation for the third time. Both of these situations trigger an automatic dismissal.

Can I still take winter/summer courses if I'm dismissed?

No, once you are dismissed, you are not eligible to take any further course work at the University for one calendar year. At the end of one year, you may reapply to WCU.

I received a dismissal letter, but I still see classes on my schedule. Why?

Even though you have been dismissed, your schedule for the next semester will not be canceled until you have had time to appeal, if you are eligible to do so. Your classes will be canceled the Friday before classes begin for the next semester.

I was dismissed, but I've already paid my tuition. Will I get that money back?

Yes, you will receive a full refund for any tuition paid for the upcoming semester.

How will I be notified that I have been dismissed from the university?

If you are subject to dismissal from WCU, a letter will be mailed to your home address to alert you to this change in your academic standing. Be sure to make the Office of the Registrar aware of any changes to your mailing address, so you do not miss any important correspondence from the university.

I was dismissed from WCU, may I take classes elsewhere?

Yes, if you are dismissed from the University, you may go elsewhere for coursework. In fact, students who wish to eventually reapply to WCU are encouraged to take courses at another university, in order to show their ability to maintain good academic standing while doing college-level work.

I was dismissed from WCU a year ago. How do I reapply?

You don't need to check in with the Academic Affairs Office before reapplying. Simply fill out the application for readmission, as found on the Undergraduate Admissions website. Once you've completed and submitted your application, the Admissions Office will forward all the necessary paperwork to the Academic Affairs Office for review.